fireandfury.com We design wargames for historical military miniatures

Fall IN 2006

Fire and Fury was well represented in this year's Fall In convention at Gettysburg. There were several BF:WW2 games and also lots of regimental F&F games as well.

Bunker Hill

Richard H. developed this scenario from the famous AWI battle (which actually took place on Breed's Hill), but unlike the original (and several playtests), the Rebel fire was ineffective and the Redcoats rolled over the position with ease.
Click on the Thumbnail for a full-size photo Description
The Redcoats prepare
The Redcoats prepare
The Recoat forces mass at the bottom of the hill.
Another angle
Another angle
Another angle of the battlefield

Chippewa

In this refight of the battle of Chippewa (War of 1812), the British rapidly dispersed an American flanking force, but then became in a straight-up slugfest in the center.
Click on the Thumbnail for a full-size photo Description
The British advance
The British advance
The British column heads up the road, while their light infantry charges and routs some Americans in the woods behind them.
Deployment
Deployment
The British columns start to deploy, while the American columns occupy a fence line.
Slugging it out
Slugging it out
The battle lines engage. The British light infantry force which went through the woods threatens the American flank.

Winter War

Steve Keyer of Two Tin Soldiers came out with a scenario book for the Winter War (one of your webmaster's favorite periods). The Finns were on the attack here, but ran straight into the Russian kill-zone, showing that it IS possible to win with the Russians in the Winter War.
Click on the Thumbnail for a full-size photo Description
Dashing through the open
Dashing through the open
Finnish infantry move across the open ground toward the woods and hills (their objectives). They encounter some Russian tanks and positions on the woodline.
Russian Artillery
Russian Artillery
Continuing their advance, the Finns come under fire from Soviet artillery. The slow attrition takes its toll of the Finnish forces.
Main line of resistance
Main line of resistance
After their advance through the open ground, the Finns encounter the main Russian force waiting for them at the top of the hill.

Russia 1941

Pete Landry and Mike Sincavage have been very successful in converting SkirmishCampaigns scenarios into BFWW2. They presented a Russian armored counterattack on a German veteran force set in the early stages of Barbarossa.
Click on the Thumbnail for a full-size photo Description
Russia 1941 01
Russia 1941 01
Russian armor advances against the hidden Germans.
Russia 1941 02
Russia 1941 02
Another angle. Some Russian tanks fall victim to surprise fire.

Tunisia

Pete Landry revisited Tunisia with another scenario pitting the U.S. versus the Germans.
Click on the Thumbnail for a full-size photo Description
Russia 1941 01
Tunisia 01
U.S. forces start their advance.
Tunisia 02
Tunisia 02
Another angle.

Infantry at Kiev

Michael Panzer put on an infantry-centric battle set in summer 1941. It is your humble webmaster's biased opinion that BFWW2 is the best system for infantry battles at the battalion level.
Click on the Thumbnail for a full-size photo Description
Kiev 01
Kiev 01
Backed by Artillery, the Russians counterattack.
Kiev 02
Kiev 02
German forces wait for them.
Kiev 03
Kiev 03
A longer view of the battlefield.

Nordwind

The inimitable Al Gaspar put on his usual visual spectacular with the battle of Rimling in operation Nordwind (Jan 1945). The Germans had a very powerful force, but showed how to lose a Jagdtiger (move it into range of a hidden M36).
Click on the Thumbnail for a full-size photo Description
Left flank
Left flank
German armor moves up, infantry follows.
You can't hurt me
You can't hurt me
On the other side, the Germans advance, spearheaded by a Jagdtiger.
Whoops
Whoops
Opening fire from ambush, the Americans leave the Jagdtiger smoking in the snow.

Oudenarde

Bill Gray has modified the original Fire and Fury rules (with Rich's permission) for both the Napoleonic and Marlburian periods. The Napoleonic rules (Age of Eagles) are available for sale and (at the current time) the Marlburian rules (Age of Honor) are available for download at the Age of Eagles website. Oudenarde was a Marlburian battle where the French were first on the field, but were cursed with atrocious command problems that threatened to split their army. Bill ran this on two days, with the commanders on the second day taking over the final positions from the first. Half of the French command is under decent command, but the other half needs to roll well to move at all. The French moved half of their force forward under their good commander, but, true-to-form, the other half could not keep up. Then the good commander decided to lead a charge personally (only about 1/100 chance of dying). Guess what happened :-)
Click on the Thumbnail for a full-size photo Description
French Cavalry Moves out
French Cavalry Moves out
The French cavalry's initial position is on a road that leads to the allied flank, which naturally lends itself to a flanking maneuver. However, because of the command problems this may not be the best option, as the rest of the army may not be able to catch up. Also, Allied reinforcements usually arrive in time to save the flank.
Continuing the move
Continuing the move
The French cavalry continues its move.
Confrontation
Confrontation
The cavalry forces square off, but the long column hasn't deployed yet.
Allied reinforcements move up
Allied reinforcements move up
The allies move up their reinforcements to counter the French.

Tiger, tiger, burning bright...redux

Greg Lyle has a simple training scenario based on the battle of Sidi Bou Zid that we run at almost every convention. This time the U.S. coordinated their charge and overran the outnumbered Germans.
Click on the Thumbnail for a full-size photo Description
U.S. advances
U.S. advances
The charge begins.
Melee
Melee
The U.S. makes contact, and the resulting close combat leaves flaming wrecks in abundance.

Palo Alto

U.S. versus Mexicans faced off in this regimental F&F battle from the Mexican war. This one featured a Mexican cavalry charge where they broke a U.S. square.
Click on the Thumbnail for a full-size photo Description
Mexican Line
Mexican Line
The U.S. columns move up toward the lines of waiting Mexicans.
U.S. moves up
U.S. moves up
The U.S. columns move up. In the upper left, a brave unit of Mexican cavalry prepares to charge.
Charge!
Charge!
The cavalry goes in, the U.S. forms square.
Charge! 2
Charge! 2
Another view - showing the opposing battlelines.

Port Republic

An ACW battle using Regimental F&F. The U.S. force initially outnumbers the Confederates, but Confederate reinforcements arrive quickly.
Click on the Thumbnail for a full-size photo Description
Confederates move up
Confederates move up
Confederate artillery duels with the U.S. while Confederates move up through the woods.
Union Battle Line
Union Battle Line
The Union Battle line forms up in the distance.

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